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1860 until 1968 – PULLMAN PORTERS: Service With A Smile!

George Pullman pioneered sleeping accommodations on trains, and by the late 1860s, he was hiring only African-Americans to serve as porters. After the Civil War ended in 1865 Pullman knew that there was a large pool of former slaves who would be looking for work; he also had a very clear racial ... Read More »

Matson Line Cruising to Hawaii and South Pacific in the 1960s

Imagine you’re planning a cruise to the South Pacific during the 1960s. Last Ocean Liners provides all the information of scheduling your trip along with the cost. A great way to cruise the past. MARIPOSA and MONTEREY Matson Line’s Mariposa and Monterey carried only First class guests and promised regal ... Read More »

Night Boats between Washington, Baltimore and Norfolk

On April 13, 1962, America’s last night boat service ended as the Old Bay Line’s steamers made there final voyages on the waters of the Chesapeake Bay ending service between Baltimore and Norfolk. Known officially as the Baltimore Steam Packet Company, which had come to be known as the Old ... Read More »

What If Titanic Never Sank?

We proudly feature a creative video from Oceanliner Designs & Illustration. About the Titanic video: In April 1912 the RMS Titanic sank on its maiden voyage – but what if it didn’t? In this episode I present a likely alternative history drawing from real-life events and the career of other ships ... Read More »

Raymond Loewy’s mid-Century designs for Matson Lines

Raymond Lowey’s basic design philosophy was behind the creation of the interiors for Matson’s luxury liner Lurline and modern ticket office in downtown Los Angeles. These were the ultimate in mid-century design for California’s famous steamship line. Raymond Loewy, whose modern concept of everything from fountain pens to airplanes, ships, ... Read More »

History of Cruising

EARLY CRUISING The earliest ocean-going vessels were not primarily concerned with passengers, but rather with the cargo that they could carry. Black Ball Line in New York, in 1818, was the first shipping company to offer regularly scheduled service from the United States to England and to be concerned with ... Read More »

Grace Line – American Flag Passenger Ships – 1882 to 1969 – Part 1

In the mid-1800s, the Irish-born Gracmid-1800ss, William Russell, and Michael established a commercial and shipping business in Callao, the port of Lima, Peru. They prospered, especially in the exporting of guano from the Chincha Islands to the United States, where this fertilizer was in considerable demand. Excellent 16mm Silent home ... Read More »

The Greatest Liner – SS UNITED STATES – The Last Great Race

Larry Driscoll’s book “The Last Great Race”  fascination with ships started as a 7-year-old, when he, his mother and two siblings boarded the S.S. America to cross the Atlantic to join his father in Paris, who worked for the Voice of America. Driscoll recalls how the ship — in the ... Read More »

1929 Home Movie Sailing from Florida to Savannah on the SS NANTUCKET…

Known as the “Queen of Sea,” the Merchants and Miners Transportation Company Steamship Line operated one of the finest fleets of passenger steamers on the Atlantic Coast and ranked foremost as one of America’s top tourist routes. It was said to be the only line plying between Baltimore, Savannah, and ... Read More »

Chicago Cubs Lands On Catalina Island

Chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr.’s twin interests in baseball and Catalina Island – he bought Catalina in 1919 and gained a controlling interest in the Chicago Cubs in 1921 – dovetailed nicely when he made the decision to have the Cubs train on Catalina starting in 1921.  In doing ... Read More »