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Home > Author Archives: Michael L. Grace (page 50)

Author Archives: Michael L. Grace

THE SS MANHATTAN… created the “Manhattan” cocktail… right out of Prohibition…

At the time of their construction, the Manhattan and her sister ship, Washington, also built by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, were the largest liners ever built in the United States, and Manhattan was the first large liner built in the US since 1905. The Manhattan and Washington were two of ... Read More »

The all-Pullman PANAMA LIMITED

The Panama Limited was a passenger train operated by the Illinois Central Railroad between Chicago, Illinois and New Orleans, Louisiana. It operated from 1911 to 1971. The Panama Limited took its name from the Panama Canal, then under construction and three years from completion. For most of its career the ... Read More »

50th Anniversary of Princess Cruises – “THE LOVE BOAT”

The SS Princess Patricia was the first “Love Boat”! For those not old enough to recall the ABC-TV series, “The Love Boat” debuted in 1977 and lasted until 1986. The series showcased cruising to the mass market. It is safe to say that ‘The Love Boat” single handedly introduced the ... Read More »

CUNARD LINE HISTORY – THE RMS AQUITANIA

The RMS Aquitania was the longest serving Cunard liner built in the 20th century and survived service in both World Wars. Originally the ship was planned to to operate on the North Atlantic service alongside the Lusitania and Mauretania. The contract to build the ship went to John Brown & ... Read More »

Duke Kahanamoku… King of the Surfboard…

Duke Kahanamoku, who won a total of five swimming medals in Olympics from 1912 to 1924, probably did more than anyone else to bring the sport of surfing from his native Hawaiian islands to the United States mainland. Almost in reverse, he also played a substantial part in the Americanization ... Read More »

THE SS NORMANDIE final days…

On February 9, 1942 crowds gathered at New York City’s pier 88 to witness a spectacle. The largest ocean liner in the world was on fire. Fire fighting efforts successfully contained the fire after five and a half hours of effort, but the effort was in vain. Five hours after ... Read More »

Last Ferryboat to San Francisco…

Southern Pacific’s OAKLAND PIER in the 1950s… The Oakland Long Wharf, later known as the Oakland Pier or the SP Mole was a massive railroad wharf and ferry pier in Oakland, California. It was located at the foot of Seventh Street. Ferry approaches San Francisco in 1941. The recently completed ... Read More »

Night Boat…

Eastern Steamship Lines was one of the last American flag coastal passenger services The following video: Home movie of a trip to Nova Scotia leaving from Pier 18 in NYC. (Some notes indicate it may be 1937.) We see Yarmouth and Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia, some large passenger ships, some ... Read More »

American Banner Lines 1957-1958

Arnold Bernstein chartered in the summer of 1948 a passenger ship the CONTINENTAL (ex ANCON of 1902) for four round voyages from New York to Plymouth and Antwerp. In 1950-1951 Arnold Bernstein was involved with the Incres Line and their ship the EUROPA (ex MONGOLIA of 1923). She spent two ... Read More »

Social History: Contemporary portrait artist Juan Bastos carries on the tradition of John Singer Sargent…

Over the past 30 years, Los Angeles-based portrait artist, Juan F. Bastos, has executed several hundred portrait commissions on three continents. These oil paintings and pastel drawings hang in private homes, corporate offices, government buildings, embassies, libraries, churches, and universities. A number of Juan Bastos’ portraits remind me of [John ... Read More »