LATEST
Home > Author Archives: Michael Grace (page 28)

Author Archives: Michael Grace

Luxury Cruising Onboard Home Line’s OCEANIC – One of the Finest Cruise Ships of the 20th Century

By the mid-1960s, when jets had killed off all but the stragglers on the North Atlantic, Home Lines introduced the OCEANIC. Home Lines proudly proclaimed that their 39,000 tonner was “the largest ship built exclusively for cruising.” By the mid-1960s, when jets had killed off all but the stragglers on ... Read More »

Brief History of Cruising – From Britannia to the Love Boat

EARLY CRUISING The earliest ocean-going vessels were not primarily concerned with passengers, but rather with the cargo that they could carry. Black Ball Line in New York, in 1818, was the first shipping company to offer regularly scheduled service from the United States to England and to be concerned with ... Read More »

“LUSCIOUS” LUCIUS BEEBE – First Openly Gay Celebrity – The Emperor of Trains

San Francisco Chronicle columnist Lucius Beebe was probably the first gay man and major celebrity to have a publicly open relationship. An author, journalist, historian, raconteur, gourmet and bon vivant extraordinary – this extraordinary personality was world-famous and a long-time columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle. He loved trains and ... Read More »

FIRST GAY CRUISE – 37 YEARS AGO

The first all-gay cruises were operated by RSVP cruises aboard the SS BERMUDA STAR thirty years ago. This is a retro look at gay life in the 1980s aboard the first gay cruises.  Operated by gay pioneer RSVP, the passengers dubbed the ship Bermuda Star Cruise Line ship the SS BRENDA STARR. ... Read More »

HITLER’S CRUISE LINE

The Germans (Nazis) created the first cruise line and built the first ships designed exclusively for cruising. Hitler sailed on the maiden voyage. The ships were large and modern. All one class with elegant public rooms. Hitler’s First Cruise Line The Germans operated the first steamship line with ships exclusively ... Read More »

Cruise the Past: Sailing north from Los Angeles to San Francisco for the USC/Stanford Game

The SS Yale and SS Harvard became known as “white Flyers of the Pacific”! The sister ships each made four sailings a week, carrying 565 First Class passengers at an average speed of 23 knots between the two major California cities. The fast coastal ships provided an overnight cruise on ... Read More »

Cruise the Past: The S.S. ACAPULCO cruising from CALIFORNIA to MEXICO during the early 1960s.

The S.S. ACAPULCO was the first passenger liner to fly the Mexican flag and commenced service from Los Angeles to Acapulco with regular cruise service in 1962. The Acapulco, a 24,400-ton cruise ship formerly sailed between New York and the Caribbean under the name S.S. Nassau. The ship was renovated ... Read More »

Cruise the Past: Sailing from Baltimore to Savannah in the 1920s.

Known as the “Queen of Sea,” the Merchants and Miners Transportation Company Steamship Line operated one of the finest fleets of passenger steamers on the Atlantic Coast and ranked foremost as one of America’s top tourist routes. It was said to be the only line plying between Baltimore, Savannah, and ... Read More »

Cruise the Past: SP’s famous DAYLIGHT in the movies.

Oscar-winning Bad Day at Black Rock was the first MGM film to be shot in Cinemascope. An American thriller film, directed by John Sturges and starring Spencer Tracy and Robert Ryan, that combines elements of the western genre with that of film noir. The supporting cast includes Anne Francis, Dean Jagger, Walter Brennan, Lee Marvin, and Ernest Borgnine. Released in 1955, the movie was filmed ... Read More »

Travel the Past: PRR’s Pittsburgher overnight All Pullman Streamliner between New York and Pittsburg

The Pittsburgher was a premiere passenger train operated between New York City and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania over the Pennsylvania Railroad’s Main Line. The PPR’s overnight all Pullman service-connected the Steel City with New York via the railroad’s mainline. It was initially launched during the mid-1920s, for many years the train pampered ... Read More »