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Author Archives: Michael L. Grace

James Cameron Stole Ideas From 1943 Nazi TITANIC Film For His Own Blockbuster Version!

The strange tale of the banned World War II Nazi German TITANIC epic on the most famous ship of all time. Before James Cameron’s 1997 blockbuster Titanic, the Hollywood Titanic of 1953, the 1958 British film A Night to Remember, and the 1997 Broadway musical Titanic – there was the ... Read More »

The Golden Age of American Passenger Trains

Premiere Passenger Trains during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s  were the finest in the world. With excellent meals, suburb Pullman service, dinner in the diner, club lounges, train secretaries, barbershops, cocktail bars, observation cars… trains like the Super Chief, 20th Century Limited, and the California Zephyr were world-famous.   New York ... Read More »

City Of San Francisco – 1952 Blizzard Traps SP Streamliner in Donner’s Pass – Part 1

The new streamliner City of San Francisco was the fastest thing on wheels between San Francisco and Chicago. For three days, its 226 passengers and crew were cut off as rescuers struggled to dig them out. Help arrived just as hope began to dim. It was late Sunday morning, Jan. ... Read More »

RMS TITANIC – See What Those Final Days Were Really Like!

Almost everyone knows about the tragic story about the sinking of the world’s largest “unsinkable” ship. The legend of the RMS Titanic has lived on in the movies, books, television, and of course, James Cameron’s 1997 blockbuster film. The facts and history of the Titanic also live on in photos ... Read More »

The MS Angelina Lauro – Fire at Sea – Classic Liner and Cruise Ship

MS Oranje, later known as MS Angelina Lauro, was a passenger liner, a wartime hospital ship, and finally a cruise ship that was lost while being towed for scrap. She sank in a storm in the mid-Pacific, on 24 September 1979. The stricken cruise ship, MS Achille Lauro, smoldering in ... Read More »

Then and Now: Comparing SP’s Shasta Daylight, and Cascade to Amtrak’s Coast Starlight!

Southern Pacific’s premier trains the Shasta Daylight, and the Cascade served the northwest from San Francisco to Portland and Seattle from the 1950s into the 1960s. They served dozens of California, Oregon and Washington cities. The Shasta was popular with tourists and the Cascade, a favorite with business people. THE ... Read More »

California’s famous all-Pullman SP streamliner LARK served San Francisco and Los Angeles via the Coast Route

Southern Pacific’s deluxe streamliner Lark was the premiere overnight passenger between San Francisco and Los Angeles. A favorite of businessmen and movie stars. The Oakland Lark connected with the Lark at San Jose then via San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara to Southern California along the coast route. The Lark rivaled ... Read More »

The Yale and Harvard – California’s Night Boats between Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco

Known as “white Flyers of the Pacific,” the sister ships each made four sailings a week. The Yale and Harvard carried 565 First Class passengers at an average speed of 23 knots between the two major California cities. The fast coastal ships provided an overnight cruise on the Pacific. They ... Read More »

The Old Bay Line Night Boats between Washington, Baltimore and Norfolk!

On April 13, 1962, America’s last night boat service ended as the Old Bay Line’s steamers made there final voyages on the waters of the Chesapeake Bay ending service between Baltimore and Norfolk. Known officially as the Baltimore Steam Packet Company, which had come to be known as the Old ... Read More »

Biggest Maritime Disaster Ever: The M.S. Wilhelm Gustloff – 9,000 plus drowned!

MV Wilhelm Gustloff was a German transport ship that was sunk on January 30, 1945, by Soviet submarine S-13 in the Baltic Sea. The former cruise liner was evacuating German civilian refugees from East Prussia, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Estonia, and military personnel from Gotenhafen (Gdynia) as the Red Army advanced. By ... Read More »